While compressed natural gas (CNG) is little known in Australia, overseas it has been used as a successful method of transporting gas on land for over 40 years. Recently, CNG technology has also been applied to marine transportation.
 
CNG is natural gas compressed for the purpose of simplified transport and storage. Gas is compressed into special gas containment tanks (GCTs) normally to a pressure of 2,900 to 3,600 pounds per square inch (psi). The capacity of a GCT depends on the volume of the tank, working pressure, temperature and composition of the natural gas. GCTs are predominantly cylindrical, varying in diameter and length, and can be made of steel or lighter-weight composite materials.
 
Feedstock gas for compression can be sourced from a natural gas field (onshore or offshore), an existing natural gas transmission pipeline, coal seam gas, biogas, and flared gas.
 
CNG on the high seas
 
CNG marine transportation is a new concept in gas shipping, at a stage similar to that of liquefied natural gas (LNG) approximately 50 years ago.
 
The first CNG carrier was built and trialled in the late 1960s, but because of the high capital cost of the ship combined with very low gas prices at the time, the project was abandoned. The mode of transport is now being pursued with great interest and CNG shipping is at the threshold of being commercialised.
 
The technology has a wide scope for commercial applications in major worldwide natural gas markets. Several marine CNG projects are now pending, following classification society approvals for ship design and CNG containment system technology. Two CNG technology providers have set up manufacturing facilities for their gas containment tanks, with one already in production.
 
CNG marine technology is suited to both onshore and offshore reserves that cannot be produced because a pipeline solution is uneconomic or because an LNG option is too costly.
 
CNG has a market niche between pipelines and LNG. A CNG project is quicker to implement than LNG. CNG shipping can also monetise stranded gas reserves quickly and provide a temporary solution – creating a market history in order to justify a pipeline or LNG transportation later.
 
Project implementation
 
CNG technology is best suited for short to medium distance projects. The considered economic range for a marine CNG project is up to 2,000 nautical miles one-way, although up to 2,500 nautical miles can be an extreme range for chilled CNG shipping.
 
The gas reserves needed for a viable CNG shipping operation vary, depending on the volume per day to be supplied over the market distance.
 
For marine CNG projects, only modest gas reserves are needed – they can be as low as around 20 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d). In addition, a CNG shipping project can have a shorter contract term of 10–15 years compared to LNG projects, which can be up to 30 years. Indicatively, the cost of CNG shipping typically can range from $US1 to $US2.50/million British thermal units (MMBtu) depending on the distance and the number of ships needed in a fleet. For small volumes and distances barge shipping may be the appropriate method.
 
The marine CNG supply chain consists of three main components:
 
The export upstream loading compression station with loading terminal (onshore or offshore)
The midstream shuttle shipping (re-deployable or movable assets)
The import downstream unloading terminal (onshore or offshore) and the unloading decompression station.
 
Costing CNG
 
The biggest investment cost in the CNG supply chain is the midstream shipping component, contributing up to 85–90 per cent of the capital investment needed. This is compared to around 25–35 per cent of the total investment for LNG shipping, making CNG projects less risky as most of the investment is in the ship assets that can be supplied by a shipping contractor. This means less investment for a project is needed for the upstream and downstream fixed end assets than would be required for an LNG project, which involves expensive liquefaction and regasification facilities.
 
The CNG supply system is optimised, modelled and designed for each specific project case as each project requirement is different.
 
CNG carriers
 
CNG carriers have a gas cargo containment system (GCS) comprising GCTs installed in a host ship hull. The system can contain many thousand GCTs of up to 30 metres in length arranged either horizontally or vertically, depending on the GCS technology design. One technology provider’s GCS consists of coiled pipe or wound pipeline.
 
CNG is normally carried in the GCSs at ambient temperatures – one displacement technology carries CNG at chilled temperatures, -20°F to -40°F, which may allow greater economic distances or more capacity of CNG cargo to be loaded. There are several GCSs on, or in the process of being developed for, the CNG shipping market.
 
CNG shipping services
 
Most GCS technology providers partner with a credentialed LNG shipping company and shipbuilder. This allows the shipping company the flexibility to offer a CNG or LNG shipping service, or both, to suit a natural gas delivery project.
 
CNG carrier cargo capacity is normally designed and optimised for a specific project – small, medium or large. A representative median cargo size is considered to be around 500 MMcf, however there are CNG carrier designs proposed for cargo capacity of 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf).
 
A small-scale GCS, for small ships or barges, can be with CNG skids, which are GCTs fitted with an ISO container or frame that can also be used for on-land storage – an advantage for an intermodal transport (sea and road) project requirement.
 
Storing CNG
 
A disadvantage of a CNG solution may be the land storage for the delivered CNG – depleted gas fields are one storage solution for CNG. Canadian company TransCanada has developed a land storage system using pipeline technology. CNG is best delivered on a continuous, uninterrupted, basis. If storage is an issue in a natural gas delivery project, then small-scale LNG may be the alternative solution to consider.
 
Regional opportunities for marine CNG transportation
 
Opportunities for marine CNG transportation are worldwide, but predominately in Indonesia and South East Asia, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, Sakahlin, Japan and Korea.
 
Several case studies for CNG transportation in Australasia have been completed in the past.
These include:
 
Between Papua New Guinea and Gladstone as an alternative or temporary gas supply solution to the proposed Papua New Guinea to Queensland gas pipeline project;
Between Gladstone and Bass Strait to New Zealand as a natural gas import alternative to LNG; and,
Between Papua New Guinea and Gove, Northern Territory for the Alcan Gove plant extension.
 
Next generation CNG – the high speed CNG carrier
 
A new technology using low drag naval architecture is being developed in the United States as the next generation CNG carrier that would enhance the transport CNG shipping economies. This is a high speed CNG carrier capable of 60+ knots service speed, three times that of a conventional type CNG carrier – capable of around 19 knots.
 
Given their high speed and a fuel consumption comparable to that of a conventional carrier over the same distance, the high speed CNG carriers could advantageously increase the economic range of CNG delivery by around three times, up to 4,500–7,500 nautical miles, thereby opening up potential new markets not previously considered within reach. Australian natural gas exporters would then have the option of a CNG or LNG supply system solution. 
 
The high speed carriers could also reduce the number of carriers in a CNG delivery system, giving significant savings on the capital investment and overall costs.
 
There has been much interest shown in the high speed CNG carrier from the gas transport industry and a first shipbuilding order is currently pending. With natural gas energy in sustained demand despite the global financial situation, gas shipping has not been, and most likely will not be, affected by the downturn in trades as has conventional cargo shipping.
 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

Actions Demonstrate U.S. Commitment to Disrupt Illicit and Destabilizing Activities in Libya

 

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) today sanctioned six individuals, 24 entities, and seven vessels pursuant to Executive Order (E.O.) 13726 for threatening the peace, security, or stability of Libya through the illicit production, refining, brokering, sale, purchase, or export of Libyan oil or for being owned or controlled by designated persons. Oil smuggling undermines Libya’s sovereignty, fuels the black market and contributes to further instability in the region while robbing the population of resources that are rightly theirs. Illicit exploitation of Libyan oil is condemned by United Nations Security Council Resolutions (UNSCRs) 2146 (2014) as modified by 2362 (2017). As a result of today’s actions, any property or interest in property of those designated by OFAC within U.S. jurisdiction is blocked. Additionally, U.S. persons are generally prohibited from engaging in transactions with blocked persons, including entities owned or controlled by designated persons.

“Treasury is taking action to expose and end fuel smuggling and other illicit activities by those who are exploiting Libyan oil, petroleum products, and other natural resources for their own personal gain,” said Sigal Mandelker, Treasury Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence. “We are disrupting this illicit and destabilizing activity by isolating the individuals, companies, and vessels engaged in oil smuggling from the global financial system.”

MALTESE, LIBYAN, AND EGYPTIAN NATIONALS
OFAC designated Darren Debono, Gordon Debono, Rodrick Grech, Fahmi Ben Khalifa, Ahmed Ibrahim Hassan Ahmed Arafa, and Terence Micallef pursuant to E.O. 13726 for their involvement in the smuggling of petroleum products from Libya to Europe. In 2016, Maltese nationals Darren and Gordon Debono formed an unofficial consortium for illicit fuel smuggling from Zuwarah, Libya, to Malta and Italy in an operation that reportedly earned the group over 30 million euros. Libyan national Fahmi Ben Khalifa managed the Libya side of the fuel smuggling operation, and Maltese national Rodrick Grech transported the Libya-originated fuel to European ports where it was sold using falsified fuel certificates, reportedly forged by Egyptian-Maltese citizen Ahmed Ibrahim Hassan Arafa, to obfuscate the fuel’s origin. Additionally, Maltese national Terence Micallef operated a Malta-based shell company to sell the smuggled petroleum products in Europe.

MALTA-, ITALY-, AND LIBYA-BASED COMPANIES
Today’s action also targets 21 companies for being owned or controlled by Darren and Gordon Debono and three additional companies for being involved in the illicit exploitation of crude oil or any other natural resources in Libya, including the illicit production, refining, brokering, sale, purchase, or export of Libyan oil.

OFAC designated Malta-based Petroplus Limited, The Business Centre Ltd., Inovest Ltd., KB Lines Limited, Motorcycle Art Ltd., Hi-Low Properties Ltd., Eleven Eighty Eight Limited, Malta Directories Ltd., Mr. Handyman Ltd., KB Investments Limited, Seabrass Limited, Tara Limited, Krakern Limited, Gorge Limited, S-Cape Yacht Charter Limited, S-Cape Limited, and Italy-based Petropark S.R.L pursuant to E.O. 13726 for being owned or controlled by Gordon Debono. OFAC also designated Malta-based Scoglitti Restaurant, Marie De Lourdes Company Limited, World Water Fisheries Limited, and Andrea Martina Limited for being owned or controlled by Darren Debono.

Malta-based companies ADJ Trading Limited and Oceano Blu Trading Limited and Libya-based Tiuboda Oil and Gas Services LLC were designated pursuant to E.O. 13726 for being involved in the illicit exploitation of crude oil or any other natural resources in Libya, including the illicit production, refining, brokering, sale, purchase, or export of Libyan oil. ADJ Trading Limited is also owned or controlled by Darren Debono, Fahmi Ben Khalifa and Ahmed Ibrahim Hassan Arafa.

Finally, OFAC identified the vessel THEODOROS as blocked property of ADJ Trading Limited, the vessels PROGRES, ZEUS, and BONU 5 as blocked property of Andrea Martina Limited, and the vessels MARIE DE LOURDES, MARIE DE LOURDES I, and MARIE DE LOURDES V as blocked property of World Water Fisheries Limited.


https://home.treasury.gov/news/press-releases/sm0298
 

CLN MARKET REPORT
DATE: 2ND APRIL 2019

BSEA/MED/UKC/BALTIC
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
LARGO SUN 37 UNL 02/APR KLAIPEDA/OPTS RNR(OWN) TRAFIGURA
STI RUBY 37 UNL 06/APR UKC/USAC-SUG WS170 CNR
BREEZE 120 ULSD 06/APR PRIMORSK/UKC RNR(COA) VITOL
NORDIC HANNE 30 ULSD 08/APR PRIMORSK/UKC WS207.5 SOCAR
STENA IMMORTAL 40 GOIL 08/APR ARA/ARGENTINE RNR VITOL
SEAFRONTIER 37 UNL 10/APR DONGES/OPTS RNR(OWN) CSSSA
SEYCHELLES PIONEER 30 ULSD 10/APR PRIMORKS/UKC RNR(COA) GAZPROM
ARCTIC BLIZZARD 37 UNL -DNR- UST.LUGA/OPTS RNR CNR
CAPT BEIRA 30 ULSD -DNR- UKC/MED RNR CNR
SHANDONG ZIHE 30 ULSD 03/APR AGIOI/ALESANDRIA WS262.5 ARAMCO
HAFNIA MAGELLAN 32 ULSD 04/APR LAVERA/MED WS248.5 P.INEOS
ALICE 33 CPP 06/APR AGIOI/MED-CANARIES WS217.5/227.5 CEPSA
HAPPY LADY 37 UNL 07/APR SARROCH/UKC-MED-BRAZIL WS180/200/195 SARAS
NH SIRI 30 NAP 09/APR SKIKDA/UKC WS260 BP
HAFNIA ROBSON 30 ULSD -DNR- XROSS MED WS265 CNR



FAR EAST
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARDMORE SEAWOLF(FLD)35 ULSD 05/APR DALIAN/HKONG-SPORE USD380K/RNR PETROCHINA
LIA(FLD) 60 CPP 09/APR N.CHINA/SPORE-OPTS USD630K UNIPEC
STI GAUNTLET(FLD) 80 ULSD 09/APR TIANJIN/SPORE-OPTS RNR UNIPEC
JAG PUNIT(FLD) 35 CPP 04/APR SPORE/AUSEE-OPTS WS170 BP
LIAN LE HU(CORR) 35 CPP 05/APR SINGAPORE/SRIRACH USD240K SHELL
OCEAN TAIPAN(RPLC) 80 COND 08/APR DAMPIER/SINGAPORE WS105 SEARIVER(EXXON)


MEG/RSEA/INDIA
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
STI GRADIATOR 90 CPP 03/APR WC INDIA/MED RNR(OWN) RELIANCE
SWARNA PUSHP 30 CPP 05/APR PRADIP/HALDIA RNR IOC
JAG PRANAM 32 CPP 06/APR PARADIP/KANDLA USD340K IOC
PROMETH.ENERGY(FLD) 90 CPP 18/APR SIKKA/UKC-SPORE USD1.85M BP
AMALIA 55 NAP 07/APR AG/JAPAN WS112.5 CSSSA
PIKE 55 NAP 10/APR AG/EAST RNR(OWN) VITOL
SEAODYSSEY 90 CPP MID APR AG/OPTS RNR(OWN) CSSSA
KLEON 90 ULSD 16/APR YANBU/UKC-SPORE USD1.6M/WS100 ARAMCO
SANMAR SANGEET 90 CPP 16/APR AG/E.AFRICA WS95 ARAMCO
PACIFIC RAWAN(FLD) 75 NAP 20/APR AG/JAPAN WS107.5 PDC

AMERICAS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
ATLANTIC LEO 38 CPP 01/APR BAHAMAS/JAMAICA RNR LUKOIL
CHIOS STAR 38 ULSD 01/APR USG/CHILE USD1.325M EXXOM
LOUKAS I 38 CPP 01/APR USG/CARBIS USD460K CNR
CENTENNIAL MISUMI 38 CPP 06/APR USG/BRAZIL WS157.5 CCI


PERIOD
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NOTHING NEW TO REPORT.


MARKET ORDER
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
PERTAMINA 200KB UMOG 03/APR SIGNAPORE-MALAYSIA/MEDAN+TANGUNG GEREM
PERTAMINA 200KB UMOG 03-04/APR SINGAPORE-MALAYSIA/JAKARTA
PERTAMINA 250KB UMOG 03-04/APR SINGAPORE-MALAYSIA/BALONGAN
ENGEN 35K CPP 13-15/APR SINGAPORE-MALAYSIA/DURBAN-WALVIS BAY RANGE
SEARIVER 35K CPP 16-18/APR SINGAPORE/PACIFIC ISLANDS
NOVA 30K PALM 20-30/APR LUBUK GAUNG/KANDLA(INT)

ARAMCO 35K UMS 07-09/APR JUBAIL/UAE
BP 35K JET 09-10/APR UAE/SOHAR
SOCAR 75K NAP 20/APR AG/JAPAN


TIME CHARTER ORDER
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

NOTHING NEW TO REPORT.

Baltic Exchange Daily Fixture/Index 29th March 2019

Baltic Exchange Dry Index 689 -3
Baltic Exchange Capesize Index 150 -17
Baltic Exchange Panamax Index 1102 +15
Baltic Exchange Supramax Index 813 -10
Baltic Exchange Handysize Index 464 -3

Timecharter
===========
'Anangel Aspiration' 2012 114013 dwt dely retro Lanshan 22 March trip via Dalrymple Bay redel Taean $7,000 - Glovis

'Flag Hope' 2011 93242 dwt dely Lianyungang 02 Apr trip via E.Australia redel China $7,800 - Louis Dreyfus

'Blue Wave' 2011 87340 dwt dely Aarhus 28 Mar 2 laden legs (1st leg St Lawrence/US Gulf iron ore) redel Gibraltar-Skaw $12,000 - Cargill

'Bulk Japan' 2006 82951 dwt dely Dunkirk 01/02 Apr trip via Kamsar redel China $15,500 - BG Shipping

'Cosmar' 2016 82025 dwt dely Recalada end April trip redel Southeast Asia
$15,500 + $550,000 - Omegra

'Ultra Lion' 2015 82000 dwt dely Gibraltar prompt trip via NCSA redel Gibraltar-Skaw $11,500 - Bunge

'Recco' 2016 81914 dwt dely Amsterdam 31 Mar/01 Apr trip via NC South America redel Singapore-Japan $17,750 - Sinotrans

'Medi Palmarola' 2018 81874 dwt dely Rotterdam 03 Apr trip via USEC redel Skaw-Passero $11,750 - Bunge

'RB Mya' 2017 81500 dwt dely Gibraltar 30 Mar/02 Apr trip via Kamsar redel Aughinish $11,000 - Nordic Bulkcarriers

'Olympic Galaxy' 2009 81383 dwt dely Singapore prompt trip via EC South America redel PMO-Japan $12,000 - Crystal Seas

'SBI Bolero' 2015 81210 dwt dely Rotterdam 01/05 Apr trip via US Gulf chop NCSA redel Singapore-Japan $15,450 - Cargill

'Omicron Atlas' 2008 76500 dwt dely Lianyungang 10/15 Apr trip via NoPac & Iraq redel PMO $10,000 - cnr

'Sudestada' 2010 75700 dwt dely aps Black Sea prompt trip redel Singapore- Japan $14,750 - Louis Dreyfus

'Sidari' 2007 75204 dwt dely Barcelona spot trip via USEC and Black Sea redel Cape Passero $10,000 - Norvic

'Ecomar G.O.' 2008 75093 dwt dely Paradip 28 Mar trip via EC South America redel Singapore-Japan $10,350 - Reachy

'Elpida' 2001 73311 dwt dely psg Taichung 30 Mar trip via Indonesia redel India $6,750 - Bainbridge

'Ultra Omega' 2015 63118 dwt dely passing Fujairah ely Apr trip via Arabian Gulf redel EC India $11,500 - Seacoast

'Star Pisces' 2015 60916 dwt dely Cilacap 04/06 Apr trip via Australia redel SE Asia $11,500 - Panocean

'Kapta Mathios' 2009 58743 dwt dely Mina Saqr prompt trip redel EC India approx $10,500 - Bainbridge Navigation

'Grande Island' 2009 58110 dwt dely Lugait 04/06 Apr trip via Indonesia redel Thailand $10,000 - D'Amico

'Interlink Activity' 2015 38569 dwt dely Recalada 07/10 Apr trip redel WC South America intention grains $20,000 - Ultrabulk

Period
======
'Navios Obeliks' 2012 181415 dwt dely Tobata 11/16 Apr 11/13 months redel WW 108.5% of BCI 5TC - CCL

'Cotswold ' 2016 179611 dwt dely Taicang 6 April 11/14 months redel Singapore-Japan range $15,250 - Rio Tinto - <27/3 fixture>

Voyages
=======

Ore
===
'Cargill TBN ' 150000/10 Port Cartier/Kwangyang 16/30 Apr $18.57 fio 60000shinc/ 50000shinc - POSCO -

'TBN' 170000/10 Teluk Rubiah/Qingdao 04/05 Apr $3.45 fio 90000shinc/30000shinc - Vale

'TBN' 170000/10 West Australia/Qingdao 8 April onwards $4.60 fio scale/ 30000shinc - Pacific Bulk

'TBN' 180000/10 Port Hedland/Qingdao 12/16 Apr $4.80 fio 80000shinc/30000shinc - Citic - <$120k PDA at Hedland>

'TBN' 170000/10 Dampier/Qingdao 7 April onwards $4.55 fio 90000shinc/30000shinc - RGL - <28/3 fixture>

Coal
====
'Orange Tiara' 2012 150000/10 Richards Bay/Gangavaram 10/17 Apr $7.00 fio 50000shinc/35000shinc - Libra

'Oldendorff TBN' 75000/10 Gladstone/Goa 10/14 Apr $13.00 fio 20000shinc/10000shinc - Vedanta Resources

'TBN' 75000/10 Dalrymple Bay/Visakhapatnam 20/29 Apr $13.25 fio 35000sshex/20000sshex - SAIL

+

Baltic Exchange Capesize Index

Route Description Value($) Change
C2 160000lt Tubarao to Rotterdam(long tons) 4.294 -0.039
C3 160000 or 170000mt Tubarao to Qingdao 11.964 +0.019
C4 150000mt Richards Bay to Rotterdam 4.345 -0.010
C5 160000 or 170000mt W Australia to Qingdao 4.682 -0.027
C7 150000 or 160000mt Bolivar to Rotterdam 6.025 -0.020
C15 160000mt Richards Bay to Fangcheng 7.940 +0.010
C8_14 180000mt Gibraltar/Hamburg transatlantic r/v 3195 -80
C9_14 180000mt Continent/Mediterranean trip China-Jpn 13023 +114
C10_14 180000mt China-Japan transpacific r/v 4146 -217
C14 180000mt China-Brazil round voyage 5182 0
C16 180000mt Revised backhaul -7700 -125
Weighted Time Charter Average(C8_14,C9_14,C10_14,C14 & C16) 3796 -76

+

Baltic Exchange Panamax Index

Route Description Value($) Change
P1A_03 74000mt Skaw-Gibraltar, transatlantic r/v 9495 +450
P2A_03 74000mt Skaw-Gibraltar trip to Taiwan-Jpn 15918 +154
P3A_03 74000mt Japan-S.Korea transpacific r/v 7322 -138
P4_03 74000mt Japan-S.Korea trip to Skaw-Passero 2516 -14
Weighted Time Charter Average(P1A_03,P2A_03,P3A_03 & P4_03) 8813 +113

+

Baltic Exchange Supramax Index

Baltic Exchange Supramax 58
S1B_58 58328 Canakkale trip via Med or BlSea to China-S.Korea 12950 -36
S1C_58 58328 USG trip to China-S.Japan 17944 -67
S2_58 58328 N.China one Australian or Pacific r/v 8518 -143
S3_58 58328 N.China trip to W.Africa 5020 -110
S4A_58 58328 USG trip to Skaw-Passero 14100 -250
S4B_58 58328 Skaw-Passero trip to USG 5497 -3
S5_58 58328 W.Africa trip via ECSA to N.China 14311 -25
S8_58 58328 S.China trip via Indonesia to ECI 8338 -118
S9_58 58328 W.Africa trip via ECSA to Skaw-Passero 9611 +11
S10_58 58328 S.China trip via Indonesia to S.China 7983 -167
Weighted Time Charter Average (all 10 timecharter routes) 9094 -104

+

Baltic Exchange Handysize 38

Route Description Value($) Change
HS1 38200 Skaw-Passero trip to Rio de Janeiro-Recalada 6832 -22
HS2 38200 Skaw-Passero trip to Boston-Galveston 6832 -22
HS3 38200 Rio de Janeiro-Recalada trip to Skaw-Passero 13967 +73
HS4 38200 USG trip via USG or NCSA to Skaw-Passero 10513 -218
HS5 38200 SE Asia trip to Spore-Japan 8566 -43
HS6 38200 N.China-S.Korea-Jpn trip to N.China-S.Korea-Jpn 8041 -18
HS7 38200 N.China-S.Korea-Jpn trip to SE Asia 8116 -18
Time Charter Average 8901 -38

+

Baltic Exchange Handysize Index

Route Description Value($) Change
HS1 28000 Skaw-Passero trip to Rio de Janeiro-Recalada 4630 -5
HS2 28000 Skaw-Passero trip to Boston-Galveston 5292 -8
HS3 28000 Rio de Janeiro-Recalada trip to Skaw-Passero 10850 +78
HS4 28000 USG trip via USG or NCSA to Skaw-Passero 7886 -164
HS5 28000 SE Asia trip via Australia to Spore-Japan 6736 -57
HS6 28000 SKorea-Japan via NOPAC to Spore-Japan 6507 -29
Weighted Time Charter Average(HS1,HS2,HS3,HS4,HS5 & HS6) 6893 -34